How Ofsted inspects your curriculum

Ofsted's 'quality of education' measure puts your curriculum in the spotlight. Understand how inspectors will judge your intent, implementation and impact, and the evidence they'll consider. Also see what's changed now the transition period is over.

updated on 2 September 2022
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Ref: 37734
Contents
  1. Transition period has ended, but you're not expected to meet all criteria to stay 'good'
  2. You're expected to provide a 32.5-hour school week by September 2023
  3. 3 central concepts: 'intent, implementation and impact'
  4. 3 elements of the inspection process
  5. What will come up in conversations about your curriculum 
  6. How inspectors will collect other evidence
  7. In a nutshell: what’s an 'outstanding' quality of education?
  8. Recap: 7 myths about the process, busted

Transition period has ended, but you're not expected to meet all criteria to stay 'good'

Ofsted ended its curriculum transition arrangements in September 2022. It previously put these arrangements in place to help schools transition to the 2019 Ofsted framework, and extended them due to the pandemic.

However, even though the transition period has ended, Ofsted recognises that schools are likely to always be revising elements of their curriculum, and won't suddenly expect you to meet every single criterion to remain 'good'.

Ofsted has added a new 'good' grade descriptor for ‘quality of education’

The curriculum may undergo necessary changes (for example, following a review by senior leaders or to take account of COVID-19) and certain aspects may be more developed than others. Where this